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Exclusive: Google asked 5,600 employees about remote work. This is what they learned

Exclusive: Google asked 5,600 employees about remote work. This is what they learned

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Contributions

  • As someone who has worked remotely in one form or another for almost a decade, the finding that resonated with me the most is to use the technology to get to know people as a separate and conscious exercise.

  • I work a four hour flight from my company's nearest clients. I have never physically met some. Phone, email and WhatsApp keep us in contact, and recently and increasingly, Zoom. It can be difficult. This article has some good tips to make it work.

  • Not all work lends itself to being done remotely. Not all people self-manage at a sufficient level to work effectively remotely.

    The majority of my work is remote; although a fair amount is merely solo. I can certainly understand the how workers feel disconnected. It’s interesting to find myself interpreting

    Not all work lends itself to being done remotely. Not all people self-manage at a sufficient level to work effectively remotely.

    The majority of my work is remote; although a fair amount is merely solo. I can certainly understand the how workers feel disconnected. It’s interesting to find myself interpreting scant information and then looking for supporting or conflicting information to validate my interpretation.

    Technology is awesome when it’s available and working. Video conferencing, at least with the systems I’ve been exposed to, isn’t there yet. Not when there’s a lot of remotes trying to have one meeting.

  • Been officially working remotely for a while now and it’s pretty great. Removing several hours of the day from commuting time is transformational ...

    I did especially like this point though:

    FIGURE OUT THE TECH, AND CLEARLY EXPLAIN THE RULES

    Tech doesn’t solve a problem if it doesn’t fit in with how

    Been officially working remotely for a while now and it’s pretty great. Removing several hours of the day from commuting time is transformational ...

    I did especially like this point though:

    FIGURE OUT THE TECH, AND CLEARLY EXPLAIN THE RULES

    Tech doesn’t solve a problem if it doesn’t fit in with how you work. Change can be hard.

  • I had experience working with remote co-workers on 6-hours timezone difference, but we had the commitment to be in the same place for at least 4 hours, so they started to work at 9am in the morning and I left the office not later than 7pm. Furthermore I have more recent work experience with people in

    I had experience working with remote co-workers on 6-hours timezone difference, but we had the commitment to be in the same place for at least 4 hours, so they started to work at 9am in the morning and I left the office not later than 7pm. Furthermore I have more recent work experience with people in my team working time to time on different office but again, initial commitment on online presence and fixed scheduled live presence in my office was key to have a productive cooperation and very good results.

    Regarding fostering real relationship I strongly believe companies should take care to organize events where people meet in person their remote colleague, including managers and other workers.

  • Remote work needs much more discipline from everyone involved in it.

  • Totally agree with this. We just did a team day and lunch was one of the actions...

  • Remote work can work if applied wisely and with the right culture #DigitalTransformation

  • The advantage of working remotely is also its disadvantage. It is easy to get a lot done when no one around you is discussing lunch or their weekend plans or whatever but then you also don’t make the same connections you would, which could theoretically improve work and make you feel human. It would

    The advantage of working remotely is also its disadvantage. It is easy to get a lot done when no one around you is discussing lunch or their weekend plans or whatever but then you also don’t make the same connections you would, which could theoretically improve work and make you feel human. It would be hard to measure the ineffable things that are lost when we don’t exchange organically (how do you quantify the affection that grows over time?) but I am sure some things are lost. still, if familiarity breeds contempt, then remote workers are exempt from that development.

  • About the subheader: Can this be considered a ‘Mukbang’