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There's a little-known feminist history of the US Supreme Court. The high court stands on land that once belonged to the National Woman's Party. Getting it wasn't easy.

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  • On Monday I went to hear Ruth Bader Ginsburg speak at an event about women's suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment and picked up this gem. It turns out, though official accounts of the Supreme Court don't say so, that the land on which the high court now stands was taken from the National Woman's Party

    On Monday I went to hear Ruth Bader Ginsburg speak at an event about women's suffrage and the Equal Rights Amendment and picked up this gem. It turns out, though official accounts of the Supreme Court don't say so, that the land on which the high court now stands was taken from the National Woman's Party in a hard-fought eminent domain case argued by a pioneering female jurist who would go on to be the first federal district court judge. Here is the story.

  • “At that time, if someone came up to you and asked you a question and you undertook to expound on the suffrage movement, then you were arrested…for speaking without a permit to speak. So when anybody tried to get me to talk with them, I didn’t talk, I didn’t answer, because I was a law student; and I

    “At that time, if someone came up to you and asked you a question and you undertook to expound on the suffrage movement, then you were arrested…for speaking without a permit to speak. So when anybody tried to get me to talk with them, I didn’t talk, I didn’t answer, because I was a law student; and I thought that if I got arrested and had an arrest record, it would be counted against me when I tried to get admitted to the bar.”

    We stand on the shoulders of giants.