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Who gets left behind in a cashless world?

Remembering Clayton Christensen

The godfather of disruption theory, Clayton Christensen, dies at 67. The Harvard professor's theory of disruptive innovation found a foothold at Silicon Valley giants like Netflix and Intel and went on to spread across corporate America and global boardrooms.Desert News

Clayton Christensen dies at 67 after lifetime of business, spiritual influence

Just as important as 'The Innovator's Dilemma' is, in my opinion, Clayton Christensen's 'How Will You Measure Yourself', a book on which he argues to consider one's own life not just with marginal thinking about quick successes (as he had outlined in business failures in Innovators Dilemma) but in the

Just as important as 'The Innovator's Dilemma' is, in my opinion, Clayton Christensen's 'How Will You Measure Yourself', a book on which he argues to consider one's own life not just with marginal thinking about quick successes (as he had outlined in business failures in Innovators Dilemma) but in the light of smart, short- and especially long-term focused decisions on, & management of resources outside the office: family, friends, health. #RIP

Very sad news but his intellectual contributions will live on!

Containing coronavirus

China’s mass coronavirus quarantine was impossible to get right. Authorities announced the travel ban would encompass 12 cities and 35 million people—but once a quarantine balloons to that size, it becomes much less effective.Quartz

China’s mass coronavirus quarantine was impossible to get right

I believe they are on the right track as millions of people need to educated in such a short time, there isn’t enough time to buy the time and consider the migration during the Chinese New Year time, the pool of people that going home to the villages has little understanding and therefore a travel ban

I believe they are on the right track as millions of people need to educated in such a short time, there isn’t enough time to buy the time and consider the migration during the Chinese New Year time, the pool of people that going home to the villages has little understanding and therefore a travel ban is a Effective tool to stop bleeding first and city lock down to stop the public event is the right one. We just have to wait for scientific vaccines to be produced to have a effective offensive measure. Luckily China has the ID system can quickly track all the people movements so that get the danger out of majorities!

How not to respond to a disease outbreak

Climate change reshapes the Himalayas

Work smarter

Don't take on too many goals at once. If you spread yourself too thin, you'll never make progress on any of your projects. Pick one goal that aligns with your long-term strategy and force yourself to work on it for a set amount of time.Harvard Business Review

Don’t Bog Yourself Down with Too Many Goals

I like Tip #4! "Force yourself to work toward the goal for a predetermined amount of time."

In other words, eliminate distraction. It’s so common for critical goals to keep getting pushed down the to-do list. You can prioritize a goal during your day by turning off distractions from coworkers, email

I like Tip #4! "Force yourself to work toward the goal for a predetermined amount of time."

In other words, eliminate distraction. It’s so common for critical goals to keep getting pushed down the to-do list. You can prioritize a goal during your day by turning off distractions from coworkers, email and social media; you can create “Zones of Focus Time” for your priorities. In my research we coined the term Micro-Resilience to describe how small changes like these make it easier to achieve big goals.

Infosys president Ravi Kumar has some tips on creating a resilient workforce. The future belongs to those who can learn to learn, learn to unlearn, and learn to relearn, Kumar says. Here are three points to ponder as we try to help the workforce learn better.Quartz

How can we create a workforce full of lifelong learners?

Problem finding / solving is inherent in the creative industries, yet so much has been made better at this point. I love the concept of ‘problem finders’ the irony is beautiful. Yet the solutions are focused on only a few industries, food, retail, transactions, most divergent thinkers seem to be applying

Problem finding / solving is inherent in the creative industries, yet so much has been made better at this point. I love the concept of ‘problem finders’ the irony is beautiful. Yet the solutions are focused on only a few industries, food, retail, transactions, most divergent thinkers seem to be applying their skills to these sectors.

As a Jeweler there is no shortage of problems in my industry to try and solve. We need more innovative lifelong learners who seek to initiate change.

Is it possible to balance competence and ethical behaviour? Most people think it’s impossible to do both. PR agency Edelman has been measuring public trust in people and institutions for the past 20 years, and the latest results are out.Quartz

Most people think it’s impossible to be both ethical and competent

We’re seeing a ramp up of the consequences of inequality in society being writ large, with the biggest trust gap between the informed public and the mass population observed to date across a record 8 markets.

Institutions are also ranked low on their ability to partner successfully with each other

We’re seeing a ramp up of the consequences of inequality in society being writ large, with the biggest trust gap between the informed public and the mass population observed to date across a record 8 markets.

Institutions are also ranked low on their ability to partner successfully with each other. The world is increasingly complex and the issues we face are increasingly global. If we have any shot of addressing issues like climate change we need strong partnerships and real collaboration between our institutions. The data shows that much work is needed to convince the public this is possible and to make this a reality

Richard Edelman refers to "Alice in Wonderland". At least with a children's story there is hope. Perhaps in my Monday mood I am overly pessimistic but I immediately thought Poe's "Masque of the Red Death " as a better description of the public perception of Davos.

It is so difficult to believe the

Richard Edelman refers to "Alice in Wonderland". At least with a children's story there is hope. Perhaps in my Monday mood I am overly pessimistic but I immediately thought Poe's "Masque of the Red Death " as a better description of the public perception of Davos.

It is so difficult to believe the public do not trust the apparent economic elites?

“National income inequality is now the more important factor in institutional trust,”

Taco Bell is paying upwards of almost six figures for branch managers to stay competitive and keep talent in the Midwest, where cost of living is lower and the gaps of income aren’t huge but still present. Almost everywhere

“National income inequality is now the more important factor in institutional trust,”

Taco Bell is paying upwards of almost six figures for branch managers to stay competitive and keep talent in the Midwest, where cost of living is lower and the gaps of income aren’t huge but still present. Almost everywhere in the world there are larger and larger gaps in pay, creating a seemingly global societal caste system.

If you break away from the ‘corporate life’ you almost dive into the pool of being underpaid for your craft and having to fight harder for your worth. The payout for many is the feeling of adding value to the greater good, making a difference, or bringing back the personal touch to our products instead of relying on next day delivery from Amazon. What will that look like in 5 years though? Or even 10?

We can all make better decisions about risk. In the first episode of RISK, Quartz’s new video series for members, psychologist Gerd Gigerenzer explains why most of us are “risk illiterate” and how, precisely, we can change that. ✦Quartz

Most of us are “risk illiterate”—but we can fix that

I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly

I like the 'frequency' approach presented here. I had previously been introduced to the breast cancer question while trying (..vainly!...) to teach myself Bayesian probability. Obviously, both approaches end up with the same result, but the graphic representing frequency is FAR simpler to grasp quickly and internalize. Looking forward to the remaining videos in this series.

The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York

The word "risk" is rooted in danger. But in practice, it's mostly a good thing. That's the underlying premise of our new show, RISK. This first episode took us to the world's first Center for Risk Literacy in Berlin and the flagship site of a now defunct criminal consumer electronics empire in New York. In my research, I was most surprised to learn that the smallest shift in the way we present information can have life-or-death consequences– and that it's not common knowledge. I'm interested to hear any questions this video prompted, as well as what you'd like to see more of in all of our future shows.

While working on this video, I really started to think about how I take on risk every day. What started as something I only thought about in terms of personal finance quickly turned into ways I could apply this thinking to other parts of my life. Becoming more risk literate has made it much easier to

While working on this video, I really started to think about how I take on risk every day. What started as something I only thought about in terms of personal finance quickly turned into ways I could apply this thinking to other parts of my life. Becoming more risk literate has made it much easier to make all kinds of decisions, from the banal (should I bike to work if there’s a 30% chance of rain?) to the emotional (how can I approach a difficult conversation with my family?) I’m especially curious to hear how our viewers will apply the lessons of risk literacy outside of economics.

I wonder if risk taking is cultural? Here in Europe we have fewer startups than in US. Is that connected to us being more risk adverse? Fewer women than men start disruptive companies. Is that connected to risk taking?

Having worked for many years in healthcare this is very helpful for patients to understand side effects. I wonder if anti-vaccination myths would have been so widespread if risk was better understood.

Now I work in influence and understand very well the impact that the way a proposal is packaged can

Having worked for many years in healthcare this is very helpful for patients to understand side effects. I wonder if anti-vaccination myths would have been so widespread if risk was better understood.

Now I work in influence and understand very well the impact that the way a proposal is packaged can affect the level of agreement. People who are afraid of risk simply need to hear it in a way that they feel comfortable with.

Great episode

I enjoyed the intro session but I'm a bit surprised that there was no mention of risk being an essential part of all decision-making rather than simply a measure of the clearly dangerous. Many people don't quantify risk well because they see it as a measure of danger, and think that it can be avoided

I enjoyed the intro session but I'm a bit surprised that there was no mention of risk being an essential part of all decision-making rather than simply a measure of the clearly dangerous. Many people don't quantify risk well because they see it as a measure of danger, and think that it can be avoided by careful behaviour. They feel its possible for individuals (and governments) to careful their way out of risk.

But all decisions involve risk; every decision is a risk decision. E.g. modern parenting often over-emphasizes physical safety, with the attendant risk of not building in adaptability, resilience, self-sufficiency, and the joy of exploration.

Batteries taking charge

Batteries are on track to overtake fossil-fuels as the primary way we power the world. But significant hurdles remain on the road to an all-electric future. Quartz’s latest presentation for members breaks down the history, science, and business behind batteries and takes you inside the race to replace Big Oil. ✦Quartz

How batteries will power the future

Chemical batteries are the promise of a cleaner future but there they cannot stand alone . Battery production is firmly tied to the chemical industry and oil. All of the components form a complex web of mining, shipping,processing more shipping, manufacturing still more shipping. All of these steps require

Chemical batteries are the promise of a cleaner future but there they cannot stand alone . Battery production is firmly tied to the chemical industry and oil. All of the components form a complex web of mining, shipping,processing more shipping, manufacturing still more shipping. All of these steps require carbon emissions. This is real world economics not the numbers game beloved by academics.

And then, yes there is a lot more, the batteries need to be charged and the production of electricity has its own spider web of interlocking factors all of which....dramatic pause emit carbon.

Finally there has to be sufficient distribution of electricity to make the whole process worth it. Otherwise whole swaths of North America will be abandoned not to mention South America , Africa and Asia.

Lots of work to do to fix these problems.

Until then you pay at the pump

Batteries will help, but in order to Have 1 billion vehicles and 300 million trucks running on electricity we need massive mining as our friend has pointed, and the production of electricity should at least double. An article in nature, published last year, pointed out that we have about ten years left

Batteries will help, but in order to Have 1 billion vehicles and 300 million trucks running on electricity we need massive mining as our friend has pointed, and the production of electricity should at least double. An article in nature, published last year, pointed out that we have about ten years left to redesign lithium ion batteries. Though some improvements have been made, our challenge is orders of magnitude higher than what we are able to handle right now. We are not going to change the fuel of the world, but the fuel of the world will modify our societies deeply

The winner of the 2020 World Economic Forum is...

"Stakeholders." The s-word was inescapable at the 50th WEF, reflecting the rapid shift in thinking about the purpose of companies—and with new environmental, social, and governance metrics, companies can now meaningfully measure their impact.Quartz

And the winner of the 2020 World Economic Forum in Davos is… stakeholders

The business case for sustainability and responsibility has been, for the past few decades, the dominant basis on which to build arguments for socially responsible action. This did result in a notable improvement and increase in investments, however we also run the risk of justifying idleness where action

The business case for sustainability and responsibility has been, for the past few decades, the dominant basis on which to build arguments for socially responsible action. This did result in a notable improvement and increase in investments, however we also run the risk of justifying idleness where action does not seem profitable. This is highlighted in instances where those responsible for decision-making have a short-term outlook, especially since many such initiatives offer long-term payoffs. Very recently, we have seen scientists urge leaders to push harder against climate change, yet the response remains weak.

Linda Dickens, talking about the sub-topic of diversity management, offers an interesting idea that we may perhaps use as a lens through which to look at social responsibility in general. The idea is a ‘tripod’ of support, motivated by the business case for social responsibility, and guided and protected by legal and social regulation (under social regulation, interestingly, Dickens particularly mentions the power and benefits that unionisation or at least employee voice could bring). Perhaps what we can read about here, this recognition of stakeholders in an organisation that we may even consider a grey area between social and legal regulation, can be seen as a part of Dickens’s tripod. I find this comparison interesting because I think we will see a great deal more of such behaviour in the future.

So you want to be a household manager

It's the right job for someone. This 54-point job ad for a household manager/cook/nanny is a case study in invisible labor. Among other duties, this nanny must "conduct research into domestic and global vacation options based on criteria" and "populate information" into a spreadsheet.Quartz at Work

A 54-point job ad for a household manager is a case study in invisible labor

I appreciate the posting. It delineates all of the responsibilities that we as parents have and all of the roles that we perform. No one can say that there was any confusion about what is expected of them. As for those who think fulfilling all of these roles and completing all of these tasks is impossible

I appreciate the posting. It delineates all of the responsibilities that we as parents have and all of the roles that we perform. No one can say that there was any confusion about what is expected of them. As for those who think fulfilling all of these roles and completing all of these tasks is impossible, welcome to parenthood!

Was watching The Crown recently - and keeping aside the fact that a lot of what is portrayed can arguably be fiction - assuming that some of it were true, it sounds like this is how royal families in history raised kids. They were raised to be scholars, warriors, kings and queens with very disciplined

Was watching The Crown recently - and keeping aside the fact that a lot of what is portrayed can arguably be fiction - assuming that some of it were true, it sounds like this is how royal families in history raised kids. They were raised to be scholars, warriors, kings and queens with very disciplined routines. And one would assume that that the kings and queens did not really do all of this work... It was their amazing loyal staff that did.

Just an observation. There's too much nuance to this for me to comment whether this is right or wrong, but all I wanted to mention is that it's definitely not 'a first' taking history into account.

Sorry, but that sounds like a two-fer job, and it's definitely underpaid given the job expectations and the prevailing wages in the area (median income for the county is $118K).

We're obsessed with rats

That's the tail end of your briefing. See you soon.